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Shanghai pavillions for Expo 2010

March 16, 2010

The theme of the Expo Shanghai is “Better City, Better Life”, and is scheduled to run until October 31, 2010. In recent months, large construction and renovation projects have dominated much of Shanghai, in preparation for becoming the World’s stage on May 1st.

The Expo Site covers a total area of 5.28 square kilometers, including the enclosed area and outside areas of support facilities. The Expo Site spans both sides of the Huangpu River, with 3.93 sq km in Pudong and 1.35 sq km in Puxi. The enclosed area measures 3.28 sq km. There are 12 pavilion groups, eight in the Pudong Section and four in Puxi, each with an average area of 10–15 hectares.

Now, the Bston Globe has published an update about the state of the construction of the pavillions, let’s see:

In this photo taken Sunday, Feb. 21, 2010, a man labors in front of the Seed Cathedral, formed by thousands of slender acrylic rods – the centerpiece of the UK Pavilion, at the Shanghai World Expo site in Shanghai, China. The expo starts May 1 and runs for six months. It is expected to draw 70 million visitors. (AP Photo)

UK Pavillion. The 20-meter-high cube-like Seed Cathedral will be covered by 60,000 slim, transparent acrylic rods, which will quiver in the breeze. Each 7-meter-long rod contains a certain type of seed, a call from the UK to protect natural species and the future of mankind.  The seeds come from all over the world, with many varieties from China. They are collected from a seed bank in Kunming, Yunnan Province, which is the Chinese branch of the UK Millennium Seed Bank Project.

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Construction workers work on the Israeli Pavilion at the 2010 World Expo site in Shanghai on January 6, 2010. (REUTERS/Nir Elias)

Israel will highlight innovation in its pavilion at World Expo 2010 along with putting a spotlight on ancient Jewish culture. The country signed a participation contract with Expo organizers today and revealed Israel Pavilion will look like two clasped hands. The two dynamic forms symbolize Israeli innovation and technology, said Irit Ben-Abba, the State of Israel’s commissioner general for Expo 2010.

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Workers walk past the Spanish Pavilion under construction at the site of the World Expo 2010 in Shanghai on March 11, 2010. (PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Covering about 6,000 square meters, the Spain Pavilion is designed to be a hand-weaved wicker basket structure supported by the steel framework inside, which locates in the Pudong area of the Expo sites neighboring the Belgium Pavilion and the Swiss Pavilion.

A worker carries a construction material in front of the Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 World Expo site Monday, March 8, 2010 in Shanghai. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

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Workers are seen at the Luxemburger Pavilion in the 2010 World Expo site in Shanghai on March 2, 2010. (REUTERS/Aly Song)

The Luxembourg Pavilion will resemble an ancient castle 15 meters high surrounded by large areas of greenery. The pavilion’s design concept is “forest and fortress,” inspired by the literal meaning of the Chinese term for Luxembourg, said the pavilion’s architect. It will cost US$9 million, has a floor space of 3,000 square meters, one of the smallest plans among all the national pavilions fitting for one of the world’s smallest countries. “Small Is Beautiful” will be a recurring theme for the pavilion.

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The Sunny Valley and the Chinese Pavilion are seen during a light test at the 2010 World Expo site in Shanghai January 12, 2010. (REUTERS/China Daily)

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Migrant laborers work on a demolished residential site in downtown Shanghai March 10, 2010. (REUTERS/Aly Song)

A Chinese worker piles up debris from old houses being destroyed in Shanghai on February 3, 2010 to make way for modern buildings at one of the many renovation sites that mushroomed in the city ahead of the Shanghai’s 2010 World Expo. (PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

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For more info and great images, please visit The Boston Globe web-site

The Official web-site of the EXPO Shanghai 2010, here.

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